Where Do Guinea Pigs Like To Be Tickled?

If you’re a pet owner, then playing and getting comfortable with your pets is your dream. You might be wondering where I can pet my guinea pig and get its cute reaction.

Like cats and dogs, you’ll get different responses depending upon the body part you tickle of your guinea pig. 

Pet owners are confused about how to tickle and pet their guinea pigs as they are small and sensitive. Furthermore, many owners are unaware of the fact that guinea pigs are prey animals.

So, by nature, they are afraid of sudden movements of a large mass, like human hands. Therefore, you need to be careful while you try to tickle them.

This article will thoroughly go through the places and processes on how your guinea pig reacts to tickling.  

Cute Reptiles as Pets
Cute Reptiles as Pets

Where Do Guinea Pigs Like to Be Tickled?

Where Do Guinea Pigs Like to Be Tickled?

People asked this question so many times in the Guinea Pig Official: “Where Do Guinea Pigs Like To be Tickled” and the answer is:

There is no specific sport that most guinea pigs love to be petted. Some guinea pigs prefer a good scratch on the back, while others do better at their belly, and some even hate it. You can start ticking your pet at each part and find the most comfortable spot for him.

There are no proven techniques to tickle your guinea pig but vary according to your pig’s reaction to various body parts. No pig is always happy being tickled or petted, and you’ll have to figure it out by experimenting. 

Guinea pigs are rodents, and they aren’t known for their trust in the world. This indicates that when you get a guinea pig, you should just not pick it up and start twisting it right away.

Instead, the first step you need to take immediately after adopting a guinea pig is to make it comfortable around its new accommodation and owner.

Some owners pet the pigs in the direction of their fur as they think this method is friendly. Also, having multiple pigs is an advantage as staying in a group. It makes them comfortable, and they are accustomed to touching and cuddling. 

It is recommended to pet the guinea pigs slowly using only one or two fingers for starters. Another great tip is not to sneak up on them or chase with the intention of petting or cuddling as they are startled easily.

Instead, the best place to start is through the head or under the chin while observing their reactions. 

Do Guinea Pigs Like to Be Tickled?

Do Guinea Pigs Like to Be Tickled?

In general, guinea pigs do not like being tickled as humans are large animals compared to their size. Moreover, since they are prey animals, they confuse large animals as predators and might act hostile. Sometimes, they tend to run away and show discomfort. 

Unlike other pets like dogs, which can be friendly and comfortable with ease, you should not treat your guinea pigs the same way. It needs a lot of time and trial to bond with guinea pigs.

Therefore, we advise you to read their body language and reactions before making any move.

Signs That Your Guinea Pig Is Comfortable Being Tickled

The most common trait that guinea pigs make while being tickled is that they start to produce different sounds like wheeking, squeaking, purring, and murmuring. Also, you can see a smile on its face and might come to cuddle with you. 

Your guinea pig will flop down like a pancake when they are comfortable being tickled. They will show trust in you by closing their eyes, it is their way of saying that they are enjoying the tickling process.

Signs That Your Guinea Pig Hates Being Tickled

Signs That Your Guinea Pig Hates Being Tickled

The signs guinea pigs show if it hates being tickled are various. The most common trait is producing strange sounds like squealing. Also, another common sign is they try to run away from you.

When your guinea pig stands perfectly still then it means they are not happy with tickling. They also show annoyance by kicking or trying to keep your hands away from them. In addition, they start to show discomfort in their faces and may even try to bite you.

Do Your Guinea Pigs Love to Be Petted or Tickled?

It’s always better to pet your guinea pigs instead of tickling them. Sometimes, guinea pigs will like to cuddle if they are comfortable enough with their owners. In most cases, older or scared guinea pigs like to cuddle with each other or with their owners. 

However, if you’re into tickling your guinea pigs, you must not be overdoing it for an extended period. A gentle rub of 2 to 3 times a day for a couple of minutes should be enough without scaring them.

Then, instead of tickling them all over the body, you must discover their sweet spot at first.

Why Your Guinea Pig Doesn’t Want to Be Petted or Tickled

Why Your Guinea Pig Doesn’t Want to Be Petted or Tickled

A guinea pig will simply avoid your petting or tickling and run away if they are scared. Another reason is that you aren’t gentle enough while petting them.

The key idea is to make them comfortable at first before being over-friendly. In the end, never force your guinea pig into petting or tickling. 

You Don’t Know How to Pet or Tickle Properly

Your guinea pig might be feeling uncomfortable due to all the rough rubbing all over its body. So pet them smoothly only on the selected parts of their body.

Your Guinea Pig Doesn’t Trust You

If your guinea pig doesn’t trust you enough, it simply will try to run away. Another symptom they’ll show is producing disturbing sounds.

What Should You Do?

Patience is the key while earning the trust of guinea pigs. You should never force them to like you. In addition, you might want to make them cozy and comfortable by giving treats and remaining close to their cages so that they’re habitual of your presence.

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FAQs

Do guinea pigs like their chin rubbed?

Yes, a gentle and smooth massage to their chin makes them happy and comfortable.

Where do guinea pigs like to be massaged?

The likely parts you would want to massage are behind the ears, chin, and head. We recommend never going down their lower body parts like stomach or legs.

How do you excite a guinea pig?

You can excite guinea pigs by regularly giving them treats or engaging them in specific tasks. A guinea pig in their cage is a nice addon making them engaged and physically fit.

How do you talk like a guinea pig?

You can easily communicate with guinea pigs through friendly body language and sounds. We advise you to make exciting sounds while playing with them or picking them up. There is a good chance that they’ll associate with these sounds.

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Last update on 2022-08-02 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

In Short

Each guinea pig reacts differently. If your guinea pig doesn’t really like being tickled, you should not force-tickle them and find an alternative way of showcasing your affection. The most effective way is to find the correct spots of your guinea pigs for petting or tickling.

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